Smooth and effective rehearsals begin with preparation by the leader before the rehearsal. How many times have I talked with frustrated worship leaders not getting enough accomplished at rehearsals, only to find out that they had not done the things necessary ahead of time to ensure a productive rehearsal? Here are a few tips to smooth out and make the best use of your musicians’ time.

 

When do we really think about the key or range of a congregational song? Furthermore, do we singers really think about these "issues" much beyond what makes our voice sound its very best? After all, we are the soloists, right? Worship leading and solo singing shares some common ground, but at the core, the roles are very, very different. It is the hope of this discussion to consider the keys and ranges of congregational song as a vital component to worship leading success. Specifically, I hope to spur reflection on our worship practices and repertoire by addressing the average congregation’s concerns within the context of increasingly "modern" worship trends.

An experience like an audition can be horrifying for people, especially being rejected by common church members. So we do everything we can to alleviate the tension. We schedule auditions in 15-minute increments to keep them short. Also we have a little lounge with somebody from our team to greet them with coffee and treats. And we videotape our actual auditions. But it is important to us that no one from the team is in there when they are being video taped. We are always trying to create an environment that is free of the awkward American Idol panel moments. We send out music ahead of time along with our list of expectations and make sure to tell them what they can expect from us-when they will hear back from us and what the process entails. The point of this is to make them feel safe. If they see the team in there, then on Sundays they see these people leading them in worship who also rejected them. We always interview them first on video. And when we look over these things, we believe in the three Cs: character, chemistry and confidence.

   
© G. Baltes / T. Schröder