Conductor? Surgeon? Prison warden? What role best describes the attitude to hold on mind when leading worthip? None of the above, according to Andy Park. The attitude should be far less grand... we should be aiming to deliver the mail, nothing more.

For some the issue of an over-developed ego can be the elephant in the room: nobody ever mentions it yet we all know it's there. Matt Redman urges us to open our eyes and face up the fact that humility is something we all need to work on.

One of the ancient Desert Fathers once noted that “Humans need humility and the fear of God, like the breath that issues from their nostrils.” And when it comes to being a lead worshipper, the heart standard of humility is just as irreplaceable a quality.

Welcome to the first interview from The Clinic, a new series that aims to take a clear, honest look at the way things are these days. First up, Matt Redman.

Kingsway: In these days of global communication, when community no longer depends on physical location, do worship leaders still need to be connected to a local church?

"So far in the series weíve looked at relational issues: building and leading a team, relating to church leadership, and so on. Itís important to get these things right if your team is going to last. But now that youíve formed a team which understands authority and supports the leadership, and is flowing together in the warm glow of unity and mutual respect - sooner or later youíre going to have to tackle the matter of actually getting them to play together! (...)

I face the dilemma of ability v. attitude. We do have some very good musicians in the church, but they donít seem very committed to the worship team. They are more interested in the bands they play in. At the same time, I have people who are desperate to play on Sundays, who are there at every practice, but who arenít very good! What should my priority be?

   
© G. Baltes / T. Schröder